Sunday, October 14, 2007

Airmen keep Soldiers, Marines in the fight

Source: Hanscom Air Force Base.

Ah, the great people behind the scenes. Back home, I hate doctors. They are so full of themselves. Not out here.

Please allow me this one moment to say I AM NOT IN THE MILITARY. I know there is a big to-do about phony soldiers, and I do not want to give the impression that I am. I just love and appreciate our troops so much. That's all folks
.

1 Oct 07
by Capt. Christopher Moore
386th Air Expeditionary Wing Public Affairs.

SOUTHWEST ASIA (AFPN) -- Army Sgt. Scott Boomershire injured his ankle kicking down doors in Iraq. However, it's up to Airmen here, stationed hundreds of miles from the infantryman's unit in Baghdad, to help Sergeant Boomershire get the medical care he needs to put him back in the fight.

Members of the 386th Expeditionary Medical Group's Contingency Aeromedical Staging Facility team are charged with preparing injured servicemembers for transport to medical facilities around the world.

"If we receive someone who looks like they can be treated in the area, we'll make sure they are cleared for travel and send them to a regional medical facility for treatment and return to duty," said 1st Lt. Elizabeth Quinn-Wilber, a CASF nurse deployed from Travis Air Force Base, Calif. "If medical conditions are too severe, we'll prepare the individual for flight aboard one of our C-130 (Hercules aircraft) and they'll be flown to Ramstein Air Base, Germany, for advanced care."

The CASF receives patients via C-130 from bases throughout the region or via ambulance from nearby military bases. Once patients arrive, the CASF staff makes sure their vitals are within normal limits, changes dressings if necessary, and prepares the servicemembers for their next journey.

"Most patients we receive are actually pretty close to being ready to go," said Senior Airman Elle Liza Marie Franz, a CASF medical technician also deployed from Travis AFB. "We keep the patients for about 12 hours -- usually just long enough for transportation to be arranged."

The CASF processes more than 300 patients a month, with ailments ranging from hernias and broken bones, to gunshot wounds and improvised explosive device-related injuries.

It's those patients arriving after being hit with IEDs that draw the most attention at the CASF. The CASF has implemented a "Battle Injury Program" where American flags are presented to those with combat injuries.

"It's the least we can do," said Maj. Cheryl Spray, the officer in charge of the CASF's medical control center and also deployed from Travis AFB. "It's a way to show that we appreciate the sacrifices that they make for us and it's a small reminder of what we're fighting for."

Photo - Senior Airman Elle Liza Marie Franz conducts a vital check on Army patient Sgt. Scott Boomershire at the Contingency Aeromedical Staging Facility Sept. 24 in Southwest Asia. The CASF is a 24-hour medical holding and staging facility, which averages about 300 patients per month. Airman Franz is a 386th Expeditionary Medical Group medical technician. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Tia Schroeder. Digg! Digg!

No comments:

Post a Comment

Please be respectful of others, so they may be respectful to you. Have a blessed day.