Tuesday, August 21, 2007

Cargo flight keeps warfighters moving

14 Aug 07
by Senior Airman Clark Staehle
379th Air Expeditionary Wing.

SOUTHWEST ASIA (AFPN) - The Airmen with the 379th Logistics Readiness Squadron Cargo Movement Flight here serve as force multipliers by ensuring anything warfighters need gets to the proper place at the proper time. Members of the flight receive and ship supplies in and out of the base to and from anywhere in the world, mainly supporting operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom forces.

The flight plays a big role in supporting airfield operations by moving mission capable parts. These parts are for when a plane is broken down somewhere and maintainers need that part to fix it. If the part needed to fix the problem isn't in stock or kept on base, members of the cargo movement flight ships the mission capable part with the highest priority to help get the plane airworthy as soon as possible.

"We support the war on terrorism by sustaining the mission to all of the (areas of responsibility) and beyond," said Master Sgt. Eric Smith, the 379th LRS cargo movements section chief. "If a shipment needs to get somewhere to repair a (broken) aircraft, we get it there by the fastest means. If our warriors need supplies to keep them in the fight, we ship it to them." The cargo movement flight, the largest in the area of responsibility, serves as a hub for other bases throughout the combat theater. The Airmen of the flight ship items that run the gamut from any aircraft part to supplies purchased by the 379th Expeditionary Contracting Squadron.

"If the military uses it, we'll ship it, no matter how big or how small," said Sergeant Smith, the Los Angeles native who is deployed here from Fort Dix, N.J. "(We provide) unlimited capability. We find the means of shipping cargo -- if it's through commercial or military means -- and get it there. We do have our challenges so we find the best and quickest way to get it to where it needs to go to sustain the ongoing mission."

The flight moves parts in one of two ways. The first way involves commercial shipping companies, like the companies any one might use to send a birthday present to a relative. The second way involves the military aircraft. If customs issues preclude commercial shipping, the flight works hand in hand with the 816th Expeditionary Airlift Squadron and the 8th Expeditionary Air Mobility Squadron to arrange airlift.

Photo - Senior Airman Nick Mendoza uses a forklift to unload a container of cargo from a pickup truck Aug. 8 in Southwest Asia. Airman Mendoza is assigned to the 379th Expeditionary Logistics Readiness Squadron Cargo Movement Flight. Airmen of the flight ship anything the military uses anywhere in the world. Photo Airman 1st Class Ashley Tyler.

Source: Air Force Print News Today.

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