Tuesday, June 26, 2007

Iraq: Railroad, Marine and Adm. Fallon

This time I have a trio for you. This was supposed to be posted Wednesday, but I have been so busy. I apologize for that. This railroad is something else. If you want to increase commerce and bring a country together, build a railroad!
"The Iraq railroad system provides efficient reliable transportation and many people rely on the railroad for traveling. It is also critical for trade and commerce from the deep-water marine port and business centers in southern Iraq to the population centers in northern Iraq," stated Edison. [Continue reading.]
Wouldn't it be fantastic if the only fights you heard were the bartering over the prices? Yes, that day will come. I just hope it is sooner rather than later.

In this next article is about my kinda gal. She is the first one in her immediate family to serve, and she did not want to be just anybody. No, she wanted to go for the gusto!
AL ASAD, Iraq - It is estimated that more than 12,000 Native Americans served in the United States military in World War I. There are more than 190,000 Native American military veterans; as the years continue to compile, so do the numbers of Native Americans in the military.
[...]
Sixkiller began her journey with the Marine Corps when she enrolled in the delayed entry program Sept. 29, 2005.

“I wanted to be one of the first in my immediate family to join one of the services,” said Sixkiller. “I picked the Marine Corps because I had to join the best." [Continue reading.]
She may not be from my tribe, but she's representing. Yeah!

This is an article about the visit that Admiral Fallon took to Iraq to check out the progress of the refineries and the insurgencies.
BAYJI, Iraq - Adm. William Fallon, commander of U.S. Central Command, met with Maj. Gen. Benjamin Mixon, 25th Infantry Division commander, and other Iraqi and coalition leaders, June 11, 2007, at the Bayji Oil Refinery to discuss the future of the refinery.

Fallon expressed his concern with getting the Bayji Oil Refinery running at its maximum potential, which included proposed methods for the protection of the oil pipelines that run to other cities and neighboring countries. [Continue reading.]
It may be so that many people are claiming that we went there for oil, but I'd like to see how they were getting around without that crude! BTW, we did not go there for oil, but that's a given. If there happens to be oil in a place where we have to attack, we are obliged to make sure those fields are protected. Have a great day!

No comments:

Post a Comment

Please be respectful of others, so they may be respectful to you. Have a blessed day.